Language
The decision was made back in 2012 in a letter by the Chief Justice stating that the demand was rejected after deliberations with Full Court of the Supreme Court.

The Central Government, in a notice on Tuesday to the government of Tamil Nadu, has reiterated that the demand to use Tamil in the court proceedings at the Madras High Court stands rejected, citing the Supreme Court’s letter stating the same released in 2012.

In 2006, the TN Legislative Assembly had passed a resolution urging the Centre to get presidential assent to make Tamil the official language in the Madras High Court, according to the notice. The rejection of the proposal, which was taken up as an unstarred question in the Rajya Sabha, was answered by the Minister of State for Law, Justice and Corporate Affairs, stating that the proposal was referred to the Chief Justice of India for advice and was rejected in 2012 after deliberations with the Supreme Court.

“The Government of India had received a proposal from the State government of Tamil Nadu in 2006 requesting permission to use Tamil language in the proceedings of the High Court of Madras. The proposal was referred to the Chief Justice of India for advice. The Chief Justice of India vide his letter dated 16.10. 2012 intimated that the Full Court of Supreme Court, after due deliberations held on 11.10.2012, decided not to accept the proposal,” the notice stated.

It is to be noted that the proposal to make Tamil the official language was rejected earlier by the Supreme Court in 1997 and 1999, after similar resolutions had been proposed. However, the Rajya Sabha has reiterated its decision, following the CJI’s letter, in the proposal made in 2006 by the TN government.

“The Full Court of Supreme Court had adopted similar resolutions earlier on 07. 05.1997 and 15.10.1999. In view of the Full Court decision of the Supreme Court no further action has been taken in the matter,” the notice stated.

The issue has been a heated one with lawyers of the Madras High Court Bench and Madurai Bench protesting, demanding for the use of Tami in court proceedings.