Education
The bench put forward this question while hearing a public interest litigation filed by a school correspondent.

Even as the Tamil Nadu Government is in talks with the centre over exempting the state from NEET this year, the Madras High Court is already asking the government about the future policy of the state. On Wednesday, the Madurai Bench of the Madras HC asked the state government why it can't consider prescribing CBSE syllabus for all schools, reports ToI.

A bench headed by justice K K Sasidharan reportedly put forward this question while hearing a public interest litigation filed by the correspondent of Syed Ammal Higher Secondary Schools, Babu Abdullah. The petitioner claimed that CBSE syllabus is followed at schools in Kerala and Karnataka which helps students when it comes to national level entrance exams. 

The petitioner's contention comes at a time when students of the State Board and Matriculation schools are facing the backlash of a syllabus that has not been updated for a decade. This is claimed to have proven to be a major setback when they wrote NEET this year. The petitioner reportedly said that NEET is based on the CBSE syllabus, which is routinely reviewed unlike in State board and hence it must be applied in all schools.

The petitioner contended that CBSE syllabus is followed in schools in Kerala and Karnataka, which helps students in those states pass national level tests easily. The bench observed that the issue could be relegated to the committee and directed the government to file an affidavit with respect to the steps it has taken to promote the curriculum.

This prompted the bench to ask, "You (the government) passed an order giving 85% reservation for students -- who completed Class XII by studying state board syllabus -- in undergraduate medical and dental courses on the ground that those students faced difficulty in competing with CBSE students in when it comes to NEET (National Eligibility cum Entrance Test). If you introduce CBSE syllabus in all schools, they will easily succeed in the national level competitive examinations. Why can't you consider it?"