Human interest
Krishna Hombal took over as the Chairman of Department of Political Science on Sept 7.

The University of Mysore (UoM) has been hailed for its decision to appoint Krishna Hombal, a visually challenged person as Chairman of the Department of Political Science. This is the first time in the university's 102-year history that a visually challenged person has taken charge of a department. 

Speaking to The News Minute from Mysuru, the newly appointed chairman said that he has the responsibility of promoting both Political Science and supporting people with disabilities. "The University has given me an opportunity to head the department. It is a historic decision for promoting equal opportunities and inclusive participation for those who are visually challenged. We want to popularise Political Science in the University. We want to promote research and improve the social utility of the department," he said. Krishna takes over from Prof GT Ramachandrappa after his term ended. 

Assistant Professor Krishna Hombal, who has been visually challenged since birth, began working in the department in 1999 and his appointment as Chairman of the Political Science Department on September 7 caps a remarkable rise through the ranks of the university. 

He studied at the Government School for Blind Children in Hubballi from 1975 to 1982 before continuing his studies at the Government High School for Blind Children at Tilaknagar in Mysuru.  He completed his BA at the Karnataka Arts College in Dharwad and his MA in Political Science at Karnatak University, Dharwad and completed his PhD from Mysuru University in 2010. 

In addition to his responsibilities at the University, Krishna is also the coordinator of Centre for Education of Visually Challenged, Project Drushti, under the University Grants Commission." I am an ambassador of visually challenged persons in the society and at the same time, I have to take the confidence of the society in the ability of visually challenged persons like me. We want to build a full-fledged centre to train visually challenged persons under this project," he said. 

The University’s decision to promote Krishna has received praise and he hopes that it will lead to more such appointments in other universities. “Inclusiveness should not just be restricted to legislation. We should encourage professionals to trust in the capabilities of persons with challenges like myself,” he said.