Water
The order was issued under the provisions of the Disaster Management Act, 2005.

Finding that water accumulated from abandoned quarries in Ernakulam are being rampantly distributed for drinking purposes, District Collector S Suhas on Wednesday put a ban on the same.

“It has come to my notice that water accumulated in abandoned quarries in the district is being distributed through tanker lorries as drinking water. As the District Magistrate and chairman of District Disaster Management Authority and being fully convinced that distribution and sale of water from abandoned quarries pose a grave threat to the public, I hereby order a complete ban on distribution of contaminated water from quarries in the district for drinking purpose,” the Collector stated in the order.

In a report to the Collector on November 20, the District Health Officer (DMO) had also recommended a total ban on such water distribution, which is a threat to health.

The order was issued under the provisions of the Disaster Management Act, 2005. A large section of city residents and commercial establishments like restaurants and offices depend on tanker lorries for their daily water needs. The distribution of contaminated water has high chances to spread infectious diseases.

In the order, Collector has also stated that strict actions will be taken against those who violate the order. “Anyone acting in contravention of this order shall be penalised under relevant provisions of Disaster Management Act and other extant instructions issued in this regard,” he said.

District Health Officer has also been authorised to conduct regular inspections in this regard. The health officer can also take necessary action against any person who is found violating the order, and even confiscate tanker lorries carrying contaminated water from quarries.

The District Collector has also directed the police officials to render necessary assistance to the DMO in enforcing the order.

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