Argentina has a historical, cultural, and to an extent patriotic connection with cattle meat.

We have found the perfect match for beef-hating Hindutvawadis Argentinians
news Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 18:42

They say opposites attract, and therefore, what better than a union between the cow-worshiping Hindutvawadis and the Argentinians, who would rather brave cancer than give up consuming beef?

Argentina has a historical, cultural, and to an extent patriotic connection with cattle meat.

Argentine Beef is widely adored and revered amongst meat lovers across the planet.

Even though it was banned in the US in 2001 after an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in Argentina, the ban was lifted in July this year much to the enthusiasm of the American people.

Erica at overtheyonderlust.com reflects this sentiment perfectly, who after splurging at a number of beef eateries in Argentina came to the conclusion that, "While Texans have some mean BBQ down – dare I say it? – I think the Argentines may have us on how to grill a steak."

So, Argentina is hands down the beef king.

Even after WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer came out with a report on Monday that concluded red meat is "probably high in carcinogenic properties", the Argentinians are undeterred.

After all, it is difficult to disarray a nation for whom beef eating is a half-millennium old tradition.

The Spanish Conquistadors were the first to bring in cows to Argentina in the early 16th century, and thereafter, there’s been no looking back. Beef has only become more and more staple for the average Argentinian, who would not be demoralized even by even WHO’s cancer report.

An Argentinian told The Guardian, "This is a part of our history. Part of our lives." 

Another told them, "I have no intention of changing because I love meat so much. Even if there are risks, I will continue. It’s like smoking and drinking. It’s rock ’n’ roll."

However, Argentina is no longer the biggest consumer of beef as it was three years ago, and that is being considered a national shame.

Writer Diego Vecino said in a magazine article published in 2013 that, "the last few years, our Argentine national identity has been roughed up as never before. The ritual of the barbecue persists, but in many cases under the kitsch glow of a retro experience."

This disappointment may hurt a little more when one considers that the population of cattle is 51 million, roughly 29% more than the human population in the country.

Argentina has also being plagued with rising prices. Many Argentinians have been forced to resort to eating less preferred meats, such as chicken.

Luis Hernández, another Argentinian told Financial Times, "An Argentine without beef is like a football team without its best striker."

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