Mollywood
The Nigerian actor had earlier alleged that he was paid less for his role in the Malayalam film because of racism.
Facebook/Samuel Robinson

Nigerian actor Samuel Abiola Robinson who acted in the Malayalam film Sudani from Nigeria had alleged last week that he was underpaid for his role.

Samuel had posted on his social media pages that he had been paid very less money for his role in Sudani from Nigeria and that he believes it is because he is African that the makers offered him so little.

However, on Wednesday, Samuel put up a post on Facebook saying the makers of the film, Happy Hours Entertainment, had gotten in touch with him to settle the issue and that he had received a reasonable sum for his work.

“To settle this, I have received confirmation receipt of payment for reasonable sum as salary for my work on Sudani from Nigeria,” he wrote on his Facebook page.

The actor further added that after his discussion with the filmmakers, he now believed that there was no racism but it was a case of misunderstanding and miscommunication.

Samuel wrote, “I previously ascribed racial discrimination to the treatment I had received but deeper enlightenment and explanation by The Happy Hours Entertainment make me believe that this was not a case of racial discrimination but a case of misunderstanding, miscommunication and misinformation (sic).”

He also apologised to the people of Kerala adding, “There is almost completely no Racism in Kerala and I believe Kerala is one of the friendliest places in Asia for an African to visit.”

Samuel also thanked Thomas Isaac, the Finance Minister of Kerala, for his support in resolving the issue.

In his post, he also requested everyone to “not direct any hatred or contempt” towards Shyju Khalid, Zakariya, Sameer Thahir or anyone involved with the Happy Hours Entertainment and explained that “disagreements” and “miscommunication” are common among “family members”.

Samuel also added that he would be donating a part of the amount he received to The Red Card Anti-Racism education charity. “I ask you to join me in doing so by visiting www.theredcard.org,” he wrote.

Samuel had earlier alleged that he was subjected to unfair and racial treatment while in Kerala. “It was nothing violent or directly in my face but for my role in Sudani from Nigeria, the producers offered me far less money than Indian actors who are not half as popular or accomplished as i am would normally earn. I only became better enlightened after meeting with several young actors and discussing payment with them,” he had written.

The Facebook post appears to have been removed now.

Soon after, Sameer Thahir and Shyju Khalid of the production house clarified that they had drawn up a contract with Samuel “after giving him a clear picture about the low-budget nature of the film and about the limit of remuneration we could give him. He entered into that contract after he agreed on paper with the remuneration. We gave Samuel mutually-agreed remuneration” and denied any racist undertones to the money offered.