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The News Minute | July 24, 2014 | 04:04 pm IST What happens when one of the top news agencies in the world carries a tweet on a life and death situation? A tweet which is grammatically incorrect and misled people into thinking the worse?  It first took people aback and they, after finding out the truth, gave lesson on grammar use and sentence construction; to one of the top news agencies in the world. The Associated Press today on July 23, put up a tweet regarding the Dutch military forces arriving in Eindhoven with the bodies of those who lost their lives in the recent crash of the Malaysian Airlines Flight 7.  They tweeted: BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash lands in Eindhoven. — The Associated Press (@AP) July 23, 2014 However, they soon realised that the sentence did not read right and was giving out the wrong message.  They, shortly, put out another tweet, rectifying the earlier one. CLARIFIES: Dutch military plane carrying Malaysia Airlines bodies lands in Eindhoven. — The Associated Press (@AP) July 23, 2014 But, some of the over three million followers of The Associated Press on Twitter took notice of the error and were soon to comment or correct them. With just a single comma, @AP gave news editors worldwide a sudden heart attack... #Doh #Oops pic.twitter.com/C7PlWa2c3y — Gabey Goh (@gabeygoh) July 23, 2014 Commas can save lives. RT @AP: BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash, lands in Eindhoven. — Khang (@KhangSports) July 23, 2014 "Arrives," not "lands" would have prevented journalistic heartburn. MT @AP: "Plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines crash lands." — Bill Rehkopf (@BillyRayKDKA) July 23, 2014 @AP WOW. Phrasing. The plane crash landed? — Thomas Myrden (@tmyrden) July 23, 2014 Jesus. Take a bus man RT @AP BREAKING: Dutch military plane carrying bodies from Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crash lands in Eindhoven. — Bunkie Perkins (@BunkiePerkins) July 23, 2014