An investigation by a global media consortium published this week found more than 1,000 individuals in 50 countries who were allegedly selected by NSO clients for potential surveillance by its flagship Pegasus spyware.

Representative image for cyber securityImage for representation (Pexels / Tima Miroshnichen)
news Privacy Tuesday, July 20, 2021 - 19:31

The Paris prosecutor's office is investigating the suspected widespread use of spyware made by Israel-based NSO Group to target journalists, human rights activists and political dissidents. The prosecutor's office said in a statement on Tuesday that it opened an investigation into a raft of potential charges, including violation of privacy, illegal use of data and illegally selling spyware. As is common under French law, the investigation doesn't name a suspected perpetrator but is aimed at determining who might eventually be sent to trial. It was prompted by a legal complaint by two journalists and French investigative website Mediapart.

An investigation by a global media consortium published this week found more than 1,000 individuals in 50 countries who were allegedly selected by NSO clients for potential surveillance by its flagship Pegasus spyware. Among them were journalists and politicians in France. Based on leaked data, the consortium identified the targets from a list of more than 50,000 cellphone numbers obtained by the Paris-based journalism nonprofit Forbidden Stories and the human rights group Amnesty International and shared with 16 news organizations. NSO Group denied that it ever maintained a list of potential, past or existing targets. It called the Forbidden Stories report "full of wrong assumptions and uncorroborated theories."

The Pegasus snooping controversy has rocked India also, with 300 of the 50,000 mobile numbers in the list being discovered to be from India. This includes two ministers, 40 journalists, three opposition leaders and one sitting judge, many activists and business persons. The Lok Sabha proceedings on Tuesday, witnessed continued disruptions and repeated adjournments of the House over the controversy. Soon after the House assembled at 3 pm, the opposition members started raising slogans on the Pegasus snooping issue, forcing the chair to adjourn the House for the day.

The issue of "snooping" using the Pegasus spyware has snowballed into a massive political row and outside the Parliament as well, with various parties demanding a thorough investigation and sacking of Home Minister Amit Shah, while the government maintains that it had nothing to do with it.

Also read:

Dismissed, rubbished and ridiculed: How Union govt reacted to Pegasus row

What is Pegasus, how to protect against it and other FAQs answered

Extremely alarming: UN high commissioner for human rights on Pegasus reports

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