International Beer Day
Flute glasses are slender in shape and this enhances carbonation. Pilsners are usually used to serve types of light beer.

The first Friday in August is celebrated as International Beer Day and this year it falls on August 4.

This initiative by AB InBev, the Belgium-based brewer that manufactures Budweiser, Corona and Stella Artois among others, shows the varied shapes of beer glasses used for different kinds of beer.

So, it features the most commonly used beer glasses and beer mugs that usually hold more beer, are easy to store and are cheaper.

There are three common variations of the pint glass– shaker, nonick and tulip. All three have a narrow body that opens up nearer the top. This releases aroma from the glass and allows for beer to be served with more head if required.

Beer Steins are similar to mugs and some feature lids. They can be made from a variety of materials including stoneware or wood; the word stein is derived from the German word Steinzeugkrug, meaning stoneware jug.

The present-day beer mugs have evolved from the steins. Since they are made of thick glass, it keeps the beer cold for longer. Its thick handle ensure that the drinker's body heat is not transferred to the beer. It is said that steins with its lids were believed to be more sanitary and that it could help prevent plague.

Flute glasses are slender in shape and this enhances carbonation.

Pilsner beer glasses are usually used to serve types of light beerSnifters capture and enhances volatile compounds, i.e. compounds that evaporate from the beer and generate aroma. Snifters have a wide bowl shape and narrow top and these are used for beers with a higher alcohol content. Its shape helps in capturing aromas and provides room to swirl the beer to amplify aromas even further.

Goblets are similar to chalices and popular in Belgium and this too is used for beer with higher alcohol content.

The weizen glass is used to serve wheat beer. They are tall, slim and tapered with a curve at the top. The tall glass allows for yeast sediment, present in many wheat beers, to settle at the bottom of the glass.