Gender violence
People who faced sexual harassment are sharing stories with the hashtag, ‘me too’.

In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal and allegations against actor Ben Affleck, social media has been abuzz with conversations about complicity, misogyny and just how pervasive these are.

Now, two words, ‘me too’, have become a rallying point for a number of people, recounting their experiences of sexual harassment and assault.

On Sunday, American actor Alyssa Milano tweeted that anyone who has been sexually harassed or assaulted should reply to her tweet saying “me too”.

About 10 hours later, the sheer volume of replies on Twitter and Facebook with the hashtag offers insight into just how common these experiences are, and how much they are questioned nevertheless.

You can some of the reactions below.

These are merely some of the experiences. If you search for the hashtag on social media, the results show hundreds of heartbreaking accounts of sexual harassment, assault, victim blaming and subjugation.

There were also people who pointed out how big a role the complicity of others plays in silencing survivors of gender-based violence.

One thing that was quite heartening about this Twitter trend was how inclusive it was.

A number of people also said that the trend was heartbreaking and urged for change.